Freezing on First Night

It never fails. No matter how nice and warm the weather is before New Year’s, the temperatures always seem to take a nosedive on New Year’s Eve. This NYE was the same in two ways – we upheld our tradition of heading into Boston for the city’s First Night celebration and it was a toasty 14 degrees Fahrenheit at nightfall.

We weren’t sure what to expect since the longtime organizer for First Night, called First Night Boston, abruptly closed in June. In October, The Highland Street Foundation (the folks behind Free Fun Fridays) stepped up as lead sponsor and encouraged other organizations to donate in order to keep First Night going.

If I hadn’t been following the news coverage, I really wouldn’t have known anything about the event had changed. The artists and performers on the schedule were all amazing, and there was the usual tradition of ice sculptures around the city and two fireworks shows.

There’s something to be said for tradition and I’m glad that First Night has become one for me, including the bone-chilling temperatures that seem to always hit on NYE.  

This Boston Marathon ice sculpture in Copley Square was one of many ice sculptures around the city for First Night.
This Boston Marathon ice sculpture in Copley Square was one of many ice sculptures around the city for First Night.
Holiday lights along Commonwealth Ave.
Holiday lights along Commonwealth Ave.
Statue of John Singleton Copley in Copley Square.
Statue of John Singleton Copley in Copley Square.
People walk on the frozen waters in the Boston Public Garden, where the Swan Boats are seen in the summer.
People walk on the frozen waters in the Boston Public Garden, where the Swan Boats are seen in the summer.
%d bloggers like this: